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The National Association of Wetland Managers (formerly the Association of State Wetland Managers) developed this online training series focusing on hydric soils for wetland professionals. This twelve module training series is for wetland field practitioners who need expertise in hydric soils and seek to understand how hydric soils are formed and how to recognize and interpret the information they provide when observed in the field.  These can also be used as refresher courses for those practitioners who have not had soils training in recent years.

The training series spans four topic areas, each with three modules - Basics of Hydric Soils, Hydric Soil Processes, Landforms and Landscapes, and Using Field Observations of Soils Onsite in Decision Making.

Target Audience:  

Wetland professionals, specifically state and tribal wetland field staff (plus state/tribal wetland managers, local municipal officials, conservation commissions, boards of health and others).

List of Hydric Soils Training Modules (12 modules)

Module 01: The Five factors of Soil Formation and Horizonation vs. Simple Processes
Module 02: Soil Texture and Structure
Module 03: Describing Soil Color for Hydric Soils Determination
Module 04: Redox Reactions and Redoximorphic Features
Module 05: Hydric Soils Functions
Module 06: The Hydric Soil Technical Standard
Module 07: Landscapes and Hydric Soils
Module 08: Problematic Landscapes and Parent Materials
Module 09: HGM and Hydric Soils
Module 10: Field Indicators of Hydric Soils in the United States
Module 11: Using Soils for Mitigation, Voluntary Restoration and Creation
Module 12: Using Field Indicators to Assess Long-term Hydrology

Optional Module Quiz and Certificate of Completion for Use in Applying for Continuing Education Credits (CEUs)

Each online module in the Hydric Soils Training Series is accompanied by an optional knowledge assessment quiz available through ClassMarker. The quiz assesses understanding of the key take-away points of the training.

To receive a Certificate of Completion for the selected online module, participants must certify that they viewed the online training and complete the quiz with a minimum score of eighty percent (80%) for the knowledge-based questions. Participants scoring less than eighty percent of the knowledge-based questions correctly will be provided one additional opportunity to pass the quiz (total of two attempts).

NAWM Members - as a benefit of membership, you will have the opportunity to download a free Certificate of Completion for each module quiz that you pass.
Log In to the membership portal to access the learning modules and quizzes.

Non-Members - you have free access to view the learning modules. There is a $10.00 USD fee per module to take the online quiz towards achieving a Certificate of Completion. Secure payment is made through PayPal, either with a PayPal account or with the guest option, using a credit card.

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Module 1: Basics of Hydric Soils – The Five factors of Soil Formation and Horizonation vs. Simple Processes

Module Description 

This module will cover both the five factors of formation and horizonation vs. simple processes.  The module presentation will begin with a review of redox reactions and redoximorphic features. Reduction and concurrent oxidation (redox) are the dominant chemical processes taking place in wetland soils. There are abiological and biological driven redox reactions in wetland soils. The session focuses on reactions driven by microbial breakdown of organic matter in soils under saturated conditions that lead to unique anaerobic conditions that meet the hydric soil definition of USDA. These redox reactions lead to mobilization of soluble Fe and Mn (depletion zones and surfaces) and subsequent reoxidation (concentration zones and surfaces), collectively called redoximorphic features. Redox feature types are identified through images. Description of the features is briefly reviewed, in preparation for use as components of field indicators of hydric soils.

Module Learning Objectives

By taking part in this online training, participants should be able to:
  • Define hydric soils
  • Describe the five factors of soil formation
  • Understand the differences between horizonation and simple processes
  • Describe organic material additions, leaching, illuviation, organic matter, and other processes 

Trainer:
W. Lee Daniels, Virginia Tech [PowerPoint Presentation]


Hydric Soils: Module 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Senior Policy Analyst, National Association of Wetland Managers

Part 1: Introduction: Jeanne Christie, Association of State Wetland Managers

Part 1: Introduction: Jeanne Christie, Association of State Wetland Managers

PlayPlay

Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, National Association of Wetland Managers
Trainer: W. Lee Daniels, Virginia Tech



To Take the Quiz and Receive a Certificate of Completion for this Module
Quiz 1

If you are a current NAWM Member, Log In here. If you are not an NAWM Member, there is a $10.00 USD fee per module quiz. To proceed with payment and access the module quiz, select the Module 1 Quiz button to transfer to the ClassMarker system. Upon successful completion of the module quiz, you will be eligible for a Certificate of Completion for 0.5 hours of training.

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Module 2: Basics of Hydric Soils  Soil Texture and Structure

Module Description 

This module focuses on two physical soil properties --- texture and structure. Soil texture describes the relative proportions of sand, silt, and clay in a mineral soil. In soils where organic matter contents are high (such as hydric soils) organic textural classes or modifiers may be used to describe the soil texture instead. Soil structure describes the naturally occurring arrangement of soil particles into peds or aggregates. The combination of soil texture and structure influences how water is stored and moves through the soil, as well as other soil processes. This module covers how these properties are characterized, as well as how they influence hydric soil processes.

Module Learning Objectives

By taking part in this online training, participants should be able to:
  • Describe the relative proportions of sand, silt, and clay in a mineral soil. 
  • Understand that soil structure describes the naturally occurring arrangement of soil particles into peds or aggregates. 
  • Understand how the combination of soil texture and structure influences how water is stored and moves through the soil, as well as other soil processes. 
  • Understand how to use organic textural classes or modifiers to describe soil texture in soils where organic matter contents are high (such as hydric soils) and characterize these properties
  • Understand how these properties influence hydric soil processes.

Trainer:
Annie Rossi, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [PowerPoint Presentation]

 

Hydric Soils: Module 2: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Senior Policy Analyst, National Association of Wetland Managers
PlayPlay

Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, National Association of Wetland Managers
Trainer: Annie Rossi, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency



To Take the Quiz and Receive a Certificate of Completion for this Module
Quiz 2

If you are a current NAWM Member, Log In here. If you are not an NAWM Member, there is a $10.00 USD fee per module quiz. To proceed with payment and access the module quiz, select the Module 2 Quiz button to transfer to the ClassMarker system. Upon successful completion of the module quiz, you will be eligible for a Certificate of Completion for 0.5 hours of training.

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Module 3: Basics of Hydric Soils –  Describing Soil Color for Hydric Soils Determination

Module Description 

This module focuses on describing soil color.  Soil color and the color patterns in soil can tell you a lot about the soil. It is an especially good indicator of soil wetness and hydric soils. The primary components that give a soil its color are soil organic matter, iron, and the color of soil particles. The Munsell Soil Color System is the standard we use to document soil color. When documenting soil color, it is important to note matrix color, mottle colors, and type, location, and abundance of mottles.

Module Learning Objectives

By taking part in this online training, participants should be able to:
  • Begin describing soil color
  • Understand basic soil colors and patterns, what colors and patterns tell about the soil and what components give soils their colors
  • Know that the Munsell Soil Color system is used to document soil color 
  • Know that documentation of soil color should include: matrix color; mottle colors; and the type, location and abundance of mottles. 

Trainer:
Lenore Vasilas, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service [PowerPoint Presentation]

 

Hydric Soils: Module 3: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Senior Policy Analyst, National Association of Wetland Managers
PlayPlay

Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, National Association of Wetland Managers
Trainer: Lenore Vasilas, NRCS



To Take the Quiz and Receive a Certificate of Completion for this Module
Quiz 3

If you are a current NAWM Member, Log In here. If you are not an NAWM Member, there is a $10.00 USD fee per module quiz. To proceed with payment and access the module quiz, select the Module 3 Quiz button to transfer to the ClassMarker system. Upon successful completion of the module quiz, you will be eligible for a Certificate of Completion for 0.5 hours of training.

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Module 4: Hydric Soil Process – Redox Reactions and Redoximorphic Features

Module Description 

This module begins with a review of redox reactions and redoximorphic features. Reduction and concurrent oxidation (redox) are the dominant chemical processes taking place in wetland soils. There are abiological and biological driven redox reactions in wetland soils. The module will focus on the reactions driven by microbial breakdown of organic matter in soils under saturated conditions that lead to unique anaerobic conditions that meet the hydric soil definition of USDA. The redox reactions lead to mobilization of soluble Fe and Mn (depletion zones and surfaces) and subsequent reoxidation (concentration zones and surfaces), collectively called redoximorphic features. Redox feature types are identified through images. Description of the features will be briefly reviewed, in preparation for use as components of field indicators of hydric soils.

Module Learning Objectives

By taking part in this online training, participants should be able to:
  • Understand reduction and concurrent oxidation (redox), the dominant chemical processes taking place in wetland soils. 
  • Understand the reactions driven by microbial breakdown of organic matter in soils under saturated conditions
  • Identify redoximorphic feature types for use as components of field indicators of hydric soils

Trainer:
John Galbraith, Viginia Tech [PowerPoint Presentation]
 

Hydric Soils: Module 4: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Senior Policy Analyst, National Association of Wetland Managers
PlayPlay

Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, National Association of Wetland Managers
Trainer: John Galbraith, Virginia Tech



To Take the Quiz and Receive a Certificate of Completion for this Module
Quiz 4

If you are a current NAWM Member, Log In here. If you are not an NAWM Member, there is a $10.00 USD fee per module quiz. To proceed with payment and access the module quiz, select the Module 4 Quiz button to transfer to the ClassMarker system. Upon successful completion of the module quiz, you will be eligible for a Certificate of Completion for 0.5 hours of training.

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Module 5: Hydric Soil Process –Hydric Soils Functions

Module Description 

The module focuses on wetland functions attributed directly to hydric soils. Functions are the biological, chemical, and physical processes that occur in wetlands. Hydric soils play a direct role in the wetland functions of water retention (short term and long term), sedimentation, carbon sequestration and biogeochemical cycling of nutrients. Due to their capacity to become anaerobic close to the surface, hydric soils support unique plant communities and wildlife habitat unlikely to be found in uplands. Functional capacity is influenced by landscape position, hydrologic characteristics, and soil characteristics. Soil characteristics that affect wetland functions include porosity, permeability, drainage class/hydroperiod, organic matter content, slope, micro-topography, and chemical properties.

Module Learning Objectives

By taking part in this online training, participants should be able to:
  • Identify the basic biological, chemical and physical processes attributed directly to hydric soils that provide wetland functions;
  • Understand how hydric soils play a direct role in the wetland functions of water retention (short term and long term), sedimentation, carbon sequestration and biogeochemical cycling of nutrients;
  • Understand that hydric soils support unique plant communities and wildlife habitat unlikely to be found in uplands due to their capacity to become anaerobic close to the surface;
  • Understand that functional capacity is influenced by landscape position, hydrologic characteristics, and soil characteristics. 
  • Identify soil characteristics that affect wetland functions, including porosity, permeability, drainage class/hydroperiod, organic matter content, slope, micro-topography, and chemical properties.

Trainer:
Bruce Vasilas, University of Delaware [PowerPoint Presentation]


Hydric Soils: Module 5: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Senior Policy Analyst, National Association of Wetland Managers
PlayPlay

Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, National Association of Wetland Managers
Trainer: Bruce Vasilas, University of Delaware



To Take the Quiz and Receive a Certificate of Completion for this Module
Quiz 5

If you are a current NAWM Member, Log In here. If you are not an NAWM Member, there is a $10.00 USD fee per module quiz. To proceed with payment and access the module quiz, select the Module 5 Quiz button to transfer to the ClassMarker system. Upon successful completion of the module quiz, you will be eligible for a Certificate of Completion for 0.5 hours of training.

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Module 6: Hydric Soil Process – The Hydric Soil Technical Standard

Module Description  

The module focuses on the Hydric Soil Technical Standard.  The Hydric Soil Technical Standard (HSTS) provides a quantitative method of determining if a soil meets the definition of a hydric soil. The HSTS can be used to: 1) Identify a soils forming as hydric soils when a field indicator may not be present (e.g. wetland creation sites, problematic hydric soils); 2) Evaluate the current functional status of a hydric soil (e.g. change to hydrology); and 3) Propose changes to hydric soil indicators (e.g. expanding jurisdictional extent of an indicator, revising an existing indicator, adding a newly developed indicator). The HSTS requires quantitative measurements showing the soil becomes saturated and anaerobic in the upper part during normal precipitation years.

Module Learning Objectives 

By taking part in this online training, participants should be able to:
  • Identify The Hydric Soil Technical Standard (HSTS) as a quantitative method for determining if a soil meets the definition of a hydric soil. 
  • Understand that The HSTS can be used to: 
    • Identify a soils forming as hydric soils when a field indicator may not be present (e.g. wetland creation sites, problematic hydric soils); 
    • Evaluate the current functional status of a hydric soil (e.g. change to hydrology); and 
    • Propose changes to hydric soil indicators (e.g. expanding jurisdictional extent of an indicator, revising an existing indicator, adding a newly developed indicator). 
  • Understand that The HSTS requires quantitative measurements showing the soil becomes saturated and anaerobic in the upper part during normal precipitation years.

Trainer:
Lenore Vasilas, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service [PowerPoint Presentation]

 

Hydric Soils: Module 6: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Senior Policy Analyst, National Association of Wetland Managers
PlayPlay

Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, National Association of Wetland Managers
Trainer: Lenore Vasilas, NRCS



To Take the Quiz and Receive a Certificate of Completion for this Module
Quiz 6

If you are a current NAWM Member, Log In here. If you are not an NAWM Member, there is a $10.00 USD fee per module quiz. To proceed with payment and access the module quiz, select the Module 6 Quiz button to transfer to the ClassMarker system. Upon successful completion of the module quiz, you will be eligible for a Certificate of Completion for 0.5 hours of training.

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Module 7: Landform and Landscapes – Landscapes and Hydric Soils

Module Description

The module focuses on typical hydric soil morphologies associated with major wetland types-tidal marshes, peat bogs, perennially-inundated swamps, mineral soil flats, floodplains, depressions, and slope wetlands. The roles of landscape position, hydroperiod, and hydrodynamics on soil morphology will be emphasized. Soil morphology is impacted by the duration of inundation, and the seasonal vertical fluctuations in water tables. Water collecting surfaces such as closed depressions facilitate ponding; water shedding surfaces on slopes promote rapid movement of surface water through the wetland. Peat bogs are hydrologically isolated and permanently saturated; floodplains receive hydrologic inputs from overbank flow and groundwater discharge, and exhibit short-term inundation. Therefore, because of differences in landscape position and associated hydrologic characteristics different types of wetlands produce distinctive hydric soils.

Module Learning Objectives 

By taking part in this online training, participants should be able to:
  • Identify typical hydric soil morphologies associated with major wetland types.
  • Understand the basic roles of landscape position, hydroperiod, and hydrodynamics on soil morphology.
  • Understand that soil morphology is impacted by the duration of inundation and the seasonal vertical fluctuations in water tables.
  • Understand how water-collecting surfaces, such as closed depressions, facilitate ponding.
  • Understand how water-shedding surfaces on slopes promote rapid movement of surface water through the wetland; and  
  • Identify how differences in landscape position and associated hydrologic characteristics different types of wetlands produce distinctive hydric soils.

Trainer:
Bruce Vasilas, University of Delaware [PowerPoint Presentation]

 

Hydric Soils: Module 7: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Senior Policy Analyst, National Association of Wetland Managers
PlayPlay

Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, National Association of Wetland Managers
Trainer: Bruce Vasilas, University of Delaware



To Take the Quiz and Receive a Certificate of Completion for this Module
Quiz7

If you are a current NAWM Member, Log In here. If you are not an NAWM Member, there is a $10.00 USD fee per module quiz. To proceed with payment and access the module quiz, select the Module 7 Quiz button to transfer to the ClassMarker system. Upon successful completion of the module quiz, you will be eligible for a Certificate of Completion for 0.5 hours of training.

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Module 8: Landform and Landscapes – Problematic Landscapes and Parent Materials

Module Description 

The module focuses on problematic landscapes and parent materials.  Most hydric soils exhibit certain common morphological characteristics that allow you to identify them as a soil that meets the hydric soil definition. Problem soils are hydric soils that do not exhibit these common hydric soil morphologies. The lack of a morphological indicator despite the soil developing anaerobic conditions in the upper part can be caused by many things including problematic parent material, certain environmental conditions, and the replenishment of iron oxides or new sediments in the upper part of the soil. For some problem soils, alternate morphologies that can only be used in specific problematic situations have been developed. For those problematic situations where an indicator has not been identified, alternative methods of identifying the soil as hydric must be employed. These techniques are outlined in chapter 5 of the Corps of Engineers Regional Supplements.

Module Learning Objectives 

By taking part in this online training, participants should be able to:
  • Identify common morphological characteristics that identify soils that meet the hydric soil definition. 
  • Understand that some hydric soils do not exhibit these common hydric soil morphologies. 
  • Understand that soil developing anaerobic conditions in the upper part can be caused by many things including problematic parent material, environmental conditions, or the replenishment of iron oxides or new sediments in the upper part of the soil. 
  • Identify alternate morphologies that can be used in specific problematic situations. 
  • Know where to locate these techniques in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Regional Supplements.

Trainer:
Lenore Vasilas, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service [PowerPoint Presentation]

 

Hydric Soils: Module 8: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Senior Policy Analyst, National Association of Wetland Managers
PlayPlay

Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, National Association of Wetland Managers
Trainer: Lenore Vasilas, NRCS



To Take the Quiz and Receive a Certificate of Completion for this Module
Quiz 8

If you are a current NAWM Member, Log In here. If you are not an NAWM Member, there is a $10.00 USD fee per module quiz. To proceed with payment and access the module quiz, select the Module 8 Quiz button to transfer to the ClassMarker system. Upon successful completion of the module quiz, you will be eligible for a Certificate of Completion for 0.5 hours of training.

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Module 9: Landform and Landscapes – HGM and Hydric Soils

Module Description 

The module focuses on the Hydrogeomorphic (HGM) system and hydric soils. The classification of wetlands in the HGM system is based on landscape position, dominant water source, and hydrodynamics – the magnitude and direction of water inflow and outflow.  Information on these parameters is contained in soils information, which is housed in the Web Soil Survey and the soils database.  While HGM interpretations are not provided directly, knowledge of soils attributes can be readily applied to make HGM class and sub-class designations.  These attributes can be used to aggregate soil map units into HGM site concepts.  A site concept is valid when all map units have similar water budgets, are in the same watershed position, and have the same water movement vectors.  The HGM system also requires the definition of a Reference Domain, within which HGM classifications are valid.  Since soil map unit concepts are generally consistent within a Major Land Resource Area, this boundary is the first selection for the Reference Domain.  Since landscape position is more meaningfully defined as watershed position, the HUC-12 watershed scale is useful for heads-up testing of map unit aggregations. Since map units often need to be either aggregated, or disaggregated into components, the use of Digital Elevation Data is useful for performing these “lumping” or “splitting” operations.  The final result should be a HGM sub-class with associated map units, or components, which can be mapped across the MLRA extent, and which is useful for land managers and conservation planners.

Module Learning Objectives

By taking part in this online training, participants should be able to:
  • Recognize that the classification of wetlands using the HGM system is based on landscape position, dominant water source, and hydrodynamics.
  • Understand that information on these parameters is contained in the soils information housed in Web Soil Survey and the soils database.  
  • Recognize that knowledge of soils attributes can be readily applied to make HGM class and sub-class designations. 
  • Understand that attributes can be used to aggregate soil map units into HGM site concepts.  
  • Better recognize when a site concept is valid 
  • Understand that the HGM system also requires the definition of a Reference Domain
  • Understand when and how specific types and uses of HGM data are useful in hydric soils work

Trainer:
Richard Weber, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service [PowerPoint Presentation]

Hydric Soils: Module 9: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Senior Policy Analyst, National Association of Wetland Managers
PlayPlay

Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, National Association of Wetland Managers
Trainer: Richard Weber, NRCS



To Take the Quiz and Receive a Certificate of Completion for this Module
Quiz 9

If you are a current NAWM Member, Log In here. If you are not an NAWM Member, there is a $10.00 USD fee per module quiz. To proceed with payment and access the module quiz, select the Module 9 Quiz button to transfer to the ClassMarker system. Upon successful completion of the module quiz, you will be eligible for a Certificate of Completion for 0.5 hours of training.

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Module 10: Onsite Decision Making – Using the NTCHS Indicators of Hydric Soils (Version 7.0)

Module Description

The module focuses on using the NTCHS Indicators of Hydric Soils (Version 7.0) for onsite decision making about soils in the field. This module shares what resources you will need to use the indicators, how to access the electronic resources (including guides, errata sheets and more).  The module will help participants understand the definitions of key terms for this work, as well as show how to combine the use of these resources effectively to aid decision making in the field.  This module brings together many of the main concepts from earlier modules (e.g. soil textures, colors, landforms) and helps the participant understand their application in an applied setting.  The module will cover important indicator caveats and provide other useful guidance for working with NTCHS Indicators of Hydric Soils in the field.

Note: If you are not familiar with the basics of hydric soils, we recommend that you complete the earlier modules in the series prior to participating in Modules 10, 11 and 12 to optimize your learning experience.

Module Learning Objectives  

By taking part in this online training, participants should be able to:
  • Explain general guides for using the NTCHS Indicators in the field
  • Recall the definitions of importance
  • List important caveats to the guides
  • Review the general structure of the indicators
  • Provide a few common indicators as examples

Trainer:
John Galbraith, Virginia Tech [PowerPoint Presentation]

Hydric Soils: Module 10: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Senior Policy Analyst, National Association of Wetland Managers
PlayPlay

Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, National Association of Wetland Managers
Trainer: John Galbraith, Virginia Tech



To Take the Quiz and Receive a Certificate of Completion for this Module
Quiz 10

If you are a current NAWM Member, Log In here. If you are not an NAWM Member, there is a $10.00 USD fee per module quiz. To proceed with payment and access the module quiz, select the Module 10 Quiz button to transfer to the ClassMarker system. Upon successful completion of the module quiz, you will be eligible for a Certificate of Completion for 0.5 hours of training.

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Module 11: Onsite Decision Making – Using Soil Science Principles for Wetland Mitigation, Voluntary Restoration and Creation

Module Description 

The module focuses on how wetland professionals can use soil science principles in onsite decision making for work in the areas of wetland mitigation, voluntary wetland restoration and wetland creation.  The module identifies common fallacies about wetland creation and reviews wetland soil reconstruction guidance protocols.  The module includes a review of learning from 20 years of collaborative research on the limitations of created wetland soils.

Note: If you are not familiar with the basics of hydric soils, we recommend that you complete the earlier modules in the series prior to participating in Modules 10, 11 and 12 to optimize your learning experience.

Module Learning Objectives  

By taking part in this online training, participants should be able to:
  • Describe common created wetland soil limitations.
  • Address three commonly held fallacies about wetland creation: 
1. Just make it “wet enough”; soils don’t matter.
2. 5% OM is a magic level for wetland creation. 
3. You can’t create wetlands in coarse-textured substrates. 
  • Review the development and essential components of created wetland soil reconstruction guidance protocols.

Trainer:
W. Lee Daniels, Virginia Tech [PowerPoint Presentation]

Hydric Soils: Module 11: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Senior Policy Analyst, National Association of Wetland Managers
PlayPlay

Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, National Association of Wetland Managers
Trainer: W. Lee Daniels, Virginia Tech



To Take the Quiz and Receive a Certificate of Completion for this Module
Quiz 11

If you are a current NAWM Member, Log In here. If you are not an NAWM Member, there is a $10.00 USD fee per module quiz. To proceed with payment and access the module quiz, select the Module 11 Quiz button to transfer to the ClassMarker system. Upon successful completion of the module quiz, you will be eligible for a Certificate of Completion for 0.5 hours of training.

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Module 12: Onsite Decision Making – Using Field Indicators to Assess Long-term Hydrology

Module Description

The module focuses on potential uses of Field Indicators of Hydric Soils to assess hydrologic characteristics of individual wetlands. This module does not teach about the Field Indicators themselves, but rather the benefits of hydrologic characterization and considerations for the use of the Field Indicators in onsite decision making.

Notes: It is not the objective of this module to provide training on the field Indicators themselves. Training on field indicators is available in Module 10 of this NAWM Hydric Soils Online Training Series. To view module #10, please scroll up the page.

If you are not familiar with the basics of hydric soils, we recommend that you complete the earlier modules in the series prior to participating in Modules 10, 11 and 12 to optimize your learning experience.

Module Learning Objectives  

By taking part in this online training, participants should be able to gain an appreciation for the potential use of Field Indicators of Hydric Soils to assess the hydrologic characteristics of individual wetlands.

Trainer: Bruce Vasilas, University of Delaware [PowerPoint Presentation]

Hydric Soils: Module 12: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Senior Policy Analyst, National Association of Wetland Managers
PlayPlay

Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, National Association of Wetland Managers
Trainer: Burce Vasilas, University of Delaware



To Take the Quiz and Receive a Certificate of Completion for this Module
Quiz 12

If you are a current NAWM Member, Log In here. If you are not an NAWM Member, there is a $10.00 USD fee per module quiz. To proceed with payment and access the module quiz, select the Module 12 Quiz button to transfer to the ClassMarker system. Upon successful completion of the module quiz, you will be eligible for a Certificate of Completion for 0.5 hours of training.

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CLASSMARKER INFORMATION

You will need to develop a username and password in ClassMarker for each online quiz. Once you click on the quiz link, you will be prompted again to provide your name and email address. This will be used to process your certificate. Participants who both view the module presentation and successfully complete the module quiz are eligible for an NAWM Certificate of Completion for 0.5 hours of training.

To receive your certificate, you must BOTH:

1. Certify that you completed viewing the Hydric Soils online training module video presentation. Answering “no” will result in no certificate being issued.
2. Complete all knowledge quiz questions with the required minimum of eighty percent (80%) of the questions answered correctly. You will be provided two attempts to take the quiz for the module. If at the end of your second attempt you have not been able to achieve a minimum score of eighty percent, you will not be eligible to receive a certificate.

You will be prompted to download your Certificate of Completion from ClassMarker after you complete the quiz. Once you download your certificate, you can then submit the certificate to the accrediting organization of your choice to potentially receive continuing education units/credits.

If you did not answer at least 80% of the quiz questions correct on your first attempt, you can re-take the test one more time (total of two attempts). Return to the NAWM module page and START the test again (vs Resume).

You must use the same email, username and password for the second quiz attempt for this same module. ClassMarker will recognize your email for the specific training module and will not charge you for the second attempt. If you do not achieve at least 80% of the quiz questions correct on your second attempt, you will not be eligible to receive a Certificate of Completion.

If you have any questions, please contact Laura Burchill at the NAWM office at (207) 892-3399. 

 

 

 

 

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